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Documentation

How to Be More Organized This School Year From the 1st Day of School

Documentation, Lesson Planning, Teachers Pay Teachers, Time Saver
Hey y’all!  I hope you had a festive 4th of July!

I’ve been thinking about how I ‘m going to organize all of my “teacher stuff” next year outside of myself/lessons. You know, all of those meeting papers and “extra” stuff you get and have to keep straight throughout the school year?

Well, I began looking at teacher binders online and wasn’t satisfied with ones I was coming across so I created my own! In this file you will get 2 cover options (a black and white polka dot cover and a colorful cover) as well as black and white printables to match! This product is an ink saver and will have free updates for life!

I created covers of each type for the following categories:
-Student Assessments
Professional Development
Substitute Binder
Faculty Meetings
Lesson Plans
IEP Caseload
Class Information
-Team Lead Information
Attendance Binder
Behavior Binder
Evaluation Binder
State Standards
-Teacher Binder
-Parent Communication Binder
Data Binder.

Colorful Cover Option


Black and White Cover Option


There are also printable sheets that can be inserted in your teacher binder. The printables include:
-Class Birthdays
-Dates to Remember
-Usernames & Passwords
-To Do List
-Notes
-Substitute Report
-Weekly Planner
-Task Tracker
-Locker Assignments
-Parent Teacher Conference Form
-Daily Schedule
-Class Roster
-Seating Chart (Graph Paper)
-Parent Communication Log (page layout for 1 student)
-Parent Communication Log (page layout for multiple students)
-Calendars At a Glance August 2016-July 2017 (Monthly Layout, 2 months per page)
-Monthly Calendar August 2016-July 2017 (1 Month per page)
-Checklist Page
-Year at a Glance
-Sticky Note Suggestions 
-Gradebook Grid
-Attendance Grid



Sub Report Sample Printable
Parent Teacher Conference Form Sample Printable
I hope you love it! I can’t wait to get to school and print mine out! If you think of anything I missed let me know and I can create it and provide it in an update of the product!

p.s. Want to start a teacher blog just like this one? My friend, Suzi, wrote an ebook that can help you get started and grow your blog!

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How to Create a Google Form to Help Streamline Behavior Documentation (a Step-By-Step Guide)

Behavior Management, Documentation, Google Forms, Middle School, QR Codes, Step By Step
Step by Step process for how to create a Google Form and connect it with a QR code for behavior documentation streamlining!
Hello! I’m so excited to share that my previous post “How to Streamline Behavior Documentation” has been bouncing around a lot on Pinterest! Through this post, I have been able to connect with a lot of teachers I otherwise would not have been able to and for that I am excited!

Since that post has been bouncing around, I’ve gotten a lot of emails and comments on the post asking more specific questions about Google Forms. In this post, I’m going to give step-by-step instructions on how I set up the Google Forms that connect with my QR codes. If you haven’t read my previous post on this topic, check it out here.


Part 1: Create the Google Form

1. Go to www.google.com and log-in.
2. In the top right corner, click the little square of 9 boxes and see a drop-down menu.
3. Click Google Drive.

4. In the left hand column, click “New”.
5. There will be a drop down menu. Click “More” for the option to see Google Forms.
6. Click Google Form and an Untitled Form will open.

7. Where it says “Untitled Form”, put the name of whatever you want the form to be. For example, if you want this form to only track one specific behavior like “Tardy to Class”, then name it that. If you think you’d like to create a form to track many types of behaviors for one student, name it the student’s name. I will show you how to set up both types of forms.
8. After you’ve named your form, write a brief description of what the form is for all who are shared to use it.
 
If you want to track one type of behavior for many students with your form (Example: a tardy log of all students):
9. Where it says “Untitled Question”, write Name.
10. On the right, you can either:
  •  make it a multiple choice question and list the names of the students in your class so you just have to select the student
    • If you choose this, select “multiple choice” on the right, then begin writing the names of the students where it says “add option”. You can do that as many times as you need to.

 

  • or make it a short answer question and you can type the name of the student in. This is the path I chose to keep the form simple.

 

 
11. Now, continue to add on to the form to include all information you’d like to track (class period, reason tardy, pass, any other notes, etc.) To add another section, click the + sign on the right. Then, follow the same steps you previously completed (select the question type, write what you want that section to be titled, etc.)
**Next year, I think I am going to make one Google Form per student and make a drop down menu of all of the behaviors I’d like to track. That way, “Molly’s” behavior can be tracked across classes all in one place. If you’re interested in doing this, just name the form the student’s name, and you can check “Dropdown” as the question type. At that point you can create all of the drop down choices of student behavior you’d like to be able to track.

12. Once you have added all of the sections to your Google Form, click “SEND” in the top right corner.

14. Now, click the link that is at the top of that window to get a link that corresponds with this code. COPY THAT LINK!

 

Your form is FINISHED! Now, on to Part 2. 


Part 2: Create the QR Code

2. Select URL and paste the URL you saved from the Google Form. Then, if you want, click “Shorten URL”.
3. Your QR Code should now be live!  Do NOT exit this screen yet!

Part 3: Test It 

1. If you haven’t already, download a QR code reader on your phone or tablet. There are many free apps. I have the QR Reader for iPhone which was just the first option that came up when I searched for one.
2. Open the Reader and allow it to access your camera. Now, point the QR reader at the QR code that is on the computer screen to test it (this saves you time from printing and then figuring out you made a mistake somewhere!).
3. If your code works, it should immediately scan the QR code and direct you to your Google Form. You may be prompted to log in to Google first before you see the form. Don’t worry, you won’t have to do that each time you scan.
4. Input test information on your form and click submit…just like you would do during class when you’re tracking information.

Part 4: Checking the Results

1. You can check the results on the original Google Form interface first, then you can create a spreadsheet. Go back to the Google Form (if it isn’t open anymore, go back to your Google Drive and select it.)
              
2. Once you’re back to the form, click responses. You will see your test responses, and data. Then, click the little green box to create a spreadsheet that will collect responses.
3. The screen that comes up should look like the picture below. Click create. It will take you to the spreadsheet that will track the responses for your QR code. The columns should be populated with the information you put in as a test.
**If your spreadsheet collected the test information, then everything is good to go! Now, as another note: anytime you log in to your Google Drive you should be able to see the original form and the form response spreadsheet. It will stay in there and continually populate as you and your team scan in information! 


Part 5: Save and Print

1. Now that you’ve checked to make sure everything is good to go, go back to your QR code on the QR Code generator screen. You need to save the code image (on a PC, right click the QR code and Save As; on a Mac take a screenshot by holding Shift+Command+4).
2. Go to a word document and insert the image of the code.
3. Label the QR code so you know what it is and save and print!  I laminated mine and put them on a key ring so I didn’t have to re-print throughout the year if I lost one or got it dirty.

You’re Finished!

 
I promise that after going through the process once, you will know what to do again and it will go much faster the next time you make one. 
 
Tell me what you think! Was this helpful? Do you think you’ll try this in your classroom, or have you done this already? Let me know in the comments or by emailing me! 

Check out: How to Differentiate Using Google Forms

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p.s. Want to start a teacher blog just like this one? My friend, Suzi, wrote an ebook that can help you get started and grow your blog!

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Data Tracking in a Middle School Classroom

assessments, data tracking, Documentation, Middle School, tracking book
Hey y’all!

One of favorite things to do in my classroom with my kids is data tracking. I know how nerdy that sounds, but I truly believe that connecting students with their own learning data is a game changer for investing students in your classroom vision and goals. Putting accountability on the students, instead of them thinking school is just something they “get” helps keeps students focused, as well as helps them feel successful. I wanted to share how I facilitate data tracking in my 8th grade language arts classroom because I feel like the majority of examples found on Pinterest and elsewhere are for elementary classrooms.

Figuring out how to “do data”, has been a learning process for me. I’ve always kept up with learning data for students myself, but it took me a while to figure out a system that worked for me, was manageable with 120 students, and was also meaningful for kids that they could also participate in.  

1. Classroom Data Wall  

I searched and searched Pinterest for middle school data wall examples that I thought would be useful, interactive, and meaningful enough to take up precious wall space for and I found this example on Pinterest for inspiration. I adapted that to become what is pictured below.

I use post-it page markers (purple/blue=1st period, yellow=2nd period, Pink=3rd period, Orange=4th period) that the kids or I place in the correct box to show where they are (1=novice, 2=apprentice, 3=proficient, 4=distinguished) at any given time for each standard (bottom grid) and for their SRI scores (top grid).. This is great to visually show students where everyone is, as well as to help them set goals.

Of course, I don’t have the students put their names on them! I would never want a student to feel badly or embarrassed, especially if they are in the 1 category for a few standards starting out. The students choose a number for themselves that only I know, and they can track themselves from there. See the picture below for a close up. For example, for standard 8.5, blue #6 is distinguished (Student who chose #6 from my 1st period class).
Close up of data wall in my classroom. The 4 colors represent 4 class period and student pick the numbers to represent them, instead of me putting their names on their tab. 
 
I love displaying data like this because it also helps students recognize their successes. Some of my students who are typically not the best test-takers can break down their numbers to see that although they have to recover some standards and aren’t quite there yet, they have also mastered certain standards. For example, a student who has traditionally been an apprentice student (~60%) connects more intentionally with seeing that they have maybe mastered 2 standards completely, and are approaching mastery with 2 standards. . . that sounds a LOT better than a 60%! 
 
Another part of the data wall is the Lexile level tracker. My students take the SRI (Scholastic Reading Index) tests 3 times a year to get their reading level score and for us to measure growth. The students chart their Lexile data on a line as they track their progress to our class big goal.


2. Posting Standards Posters

Next to the data wall, I post all of the reading standards, and some of the writing standards. Next year, I will probably put them in key rings to hang for students to flip through, or will only post our focus standards per 6 weeks with their rubrics and have the others available to see (just for the sake of space). Although it takes up a LOT of space, I love having them posted for myself, as well as for the kids to familiarize themselves with them. Having the students not only be able to talk about their data in a real way, but understand what goes into each standard is a huge key in getting novices out of novice and helping others key into what they need to do to move up.

I post the Reading: Informational and Reading: Literature standards on different colored paper because again, I want students to really understand the skills they are being asked to master. I want my classroom to be able to move beyond the “I got 8 out of 10 so I’m proficient” talk. This is definitely a huge work in progress, but having the standards posted, visible, and where students can access them has been a HUGE help!

(I have standards posters like these for 6th, 7th, 8th grade ELA and Math in my store, and will be adding more soon!)

3. Student Tracking Books

Outside of having student learning data posted, I have students keep a detailed student tracking book. After each assessment they need to track, they record how they did in detail, down to the specific questions they got correct, and incorrect. Students figure out what questions those standards correlated to, and which standards they showed mastery of, or need to work on. They then put their test performance on a bar graph so they can track their progress (by standard) from pre-tests and post-tests. Students also keep track of their reading level growth, and on-demand writing/extended response/short answer scores. It sounds like a lot, but once it is routine for the kids after the first few times, it is easy! 

I’m working on a tracking book for middle/high school students that can be adapted for different subjects–I will share as soon as it is finished!Again, I really like data tracking with my students. I think it is important for them to buy into their progress, and really understand why they are doing what they are doing in class each day.



I’m always checking blogs and Pinterest posts to see how others are tracking data to see if this process can be refined or if there is something that could work better, so of course, I’d love to hear from you in the comments section! How do you track data in your classroom? Any new ideas to share? Let me hear them!

 

p.s. Want to start a teacher blog just like this one? My friend, Suzi, wrote an ebook that can help you get started!

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How to Streamline Behavior Documentation in a Middle School Classroom

Behavior Management, Documentation, Featured, Middle School, Time Saver
This process has SAVED my team's sanity! How to Streamline Behavior Documentation in a Middle School Classroom
I can’t believe it has been about 2 months since my last post! I came running back to the blog tonight because I have to share something I found on Pinterest (of course) that is streamlining some behavior documentation in my classroom and on my team: Using QR Codes with Google Forms. 
If you’re not tech savvy and the terms “QR Codes” and “Google Forms” scare you…just hear me out! 

What It Is

On the original post I saw (shoutout to PeppyZestyTeacherista.com! Check her out!), the teacher who has a 1:1 iPad classroom uses QR codes to help her document missing homework assignments from students. The students come in, and those who don’t have their homework scan a QR code that is on a poster on her wall, fill out the Google Form and boom! She has everything documented in one spreadsheet! This got my mind rolling. Now, I definitely don’t have a 1:1 iPad classroom (I have 3 desktops and no tablets) but I knew I could somehow use this to make life easier for me and my team. It hit me: team behavior documentation!
Let me backtrack a minute. . . as an 8th grade teacher, my school works in teams. One ELA teacher, one math teacher, one social studies teacher and one science teacher all share the same students. Previously, we were spending a good chunk of time documenting and tracking behaviors that we needed to follow up on like who was tardy to class, who was out of dress code, who needed to take a break in another classroom, who has lunch detentions, etc. Now, this is NO MORE!

What I Did

I made a Google Form to correspond with anything I wanted to track, and then linked that to a QR code. I then printed it on a half sheet of colored paper, laminated, and put it on a key ring to keep it together. Now, if someone is tardy to class (or whatever else happens that I scan for) I can quickly fill in the information I want and done! The best thing about this is that when any of my teammates do this as well, it all goes to a shared spreadsheet I can access in my Google Drive! 
Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 10.02.31 PM
  How to Set It Up
  1. Download a QR Code reader on your smartphone. I have an iPhone and have “QR Reader for iPhone”.
  2. Go to your Google account and make a new Google Form for whatever you’re wanting to track and be able to scan.
  3. When you’re finished building the Google Form, copy the link that Google gives you that is attached to the form (the link you’d use to share it with someone else).
  4. Google a QR Code generator. I used this one: https://www.the-qrcode-generator.com.
  5. Select URL on the QR Code Generator and copy the link to the Google Form you made into the “Enter URL Here” box. From here, a custom QR Code should be made.
  6. Save the QR code that you just made.
  7. Insert the picture of the QR code you made onto a word document, label what the code is for and print.
  8. Use the QR Code reader on your phone and scan the QR code to test it. The Google Form you filled out should pull up on your phone or device.
  9. Fill out test information in the fields and then visit your Google Form response spreadsheet in your Google Drive to make sure everything shows up. If it does, you’re FINISHED!
So what do you think? Will this make anything easier for you in your classroom? I’d love to hear how you use Google Forms or QR codes in your classroom!

Again, shoutout to Amber at PeppyZestyTeacherista.com for the original post! 

Peppy Zesty Teacherista


*UPDATE: I’ve received many in-depth questions about how to do this, so I created a more in-depth Step-By-Step Guide! Check it out here.

 
Also, check out How to Differentiate Using Google Forms here


 

 

p.s. Want to start a teacher blog just like this one? My friend, Suzi, wrote an ebook that can help you get started!